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Results for "condemnation" within Inquiries

Displaying 1 - 6 of about 6 results.

No, probably not. Statutory authority for school district condemnations is provided by RCW 28A.335.220 and ch. 8.16 RCW . Neither provision, however, indicates that the school district power extends to the condemnation of publicly owned land. AGO 55-57 No. 335 concludes:...
Inquiries
Yes, it may. RCW 8.12.030 provides in part:   Every city and town and each unclassified city and town within the state of Washington, is hereby authorized and empowered to condemn land and property, including state, county and school lands and property ... What if t...
Inquiries
No. RCW 82.45.010 (3)(g) specifically exempts transfers of property through condemnation proceedings from the definition of "sale" for purposes of the real estate excise tax.
Inquiries
The question the Court was deciding in Kelo v. New London was whether the city of New London's condemnations to promote economic development were for a "public use" within the meaning of the 5th Amendment to the Federal Constitution (e.g., the "takings clause"). However, t...
Inquiries
No. There is no statute that requires codification of all ordinances. Indeed, there are many types of ordinances required by law that are not appropriate or suitable for codification, such as ordinances approving annexations and street vacations, and ordinances initiating con...
Inquiries
The general rule is as expressed in the court decisions below. And, it is reflected in the street vacation statutes, which assume this general rule. See RCW 35.79.040 ("If any street or alley in any city or town is vacated by the city or town council, the property within th...
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