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Year-End Personnel Topics Pop Quiz


December 16, 2016 by Paul Sullivan
Category: Personnel

Year-End Personnel Topics Pop Quiz

Here’s a short quiz to test your memory of some common personnel-related legal issues as well as several new employment laws that came into effect in 2016. This is an open-book exam and won’t be graded. A link to the answer will be provided following the question, and the answers will include references or links to additional information related to the question asked.

Good luck!

Question 1:

Jordan works in accounting and is a full-time FLSA nonexempt employee. Due to illness, she goes home sick after working four hours on Monday and, to catch up on her work, she works nine hours a day for the remaining four days of the week. The normal work day is eight hours long. For that week, Jordan should be paid:

  1. Four hours of sick leave pay, 36 hours of regular pay and 4 hours of overtime.
  2. Four hours of sick leave pay, 36 hours of regular pay and 6 hours of overtime.
  3. Four hours of sick leave pay, 36 hours of regular pay and no overtime pay.
  4. Four hours of sick leave pay, 40 hours of regular pay and no overtime pay.

Answer

Question 2:

On May 23, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor revised the “salary test” for determining if a white collar worker qualifies as an exempt employee not subject to overtime pay, raising the qualifying salary from $455 per week to $913 per week. Frank’s job description satisfies the FLSA “duties test” to be exempt and he is paid $800 per week. If during the week of December 5 Franks works 45 hours, should he be paid for five hours of overtime?

  1. Yes, he should be paid five hours of overtime pay for the week.
  2. No, Frank qualifies as an exempt employee and should not be paid overtime.

Answer

Question 3:

Due to a mathematical error, Casey, a city employee, was overpaid by $95 for the month of January. Must the city seek to recover the overpayment?

  1. Yes. If no attempt is made to recover the overpayment, there would be a gift of public funds.
  2. No, since the amount of the overpayment is less than $100, the city is not required to recover the amount of the overpayment.
  3. No. Since it was the city’s mistake, there is no requirement that an attempt be made to recover the overpayment.

Answer

Question 4:

Starting January 1, 2017, what will the minimum wage be in Washington State?

  1. $9.47 per hour
  2. $11.00 per hour
  3. $7.25 per hour
  4. $15.00 per hour

Answer

Question 5:

Larry and Mark are assigned to drive to Portland for a two-day training program. Their normal work hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday to Friday. They leave work at 8:00 a.m. for the three-hour drive and they return the following day, leaving Portland at 5:00 p.m., with Mark driving. Assuming the training lasted until 5:00 p.m. the first day and went from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. the following day, should Larry and Mark be paid any overtime hours?

  1. Larry and Mark should each be paid three hours of overtime.
  2. Only Mark should be paid for three hours of overtime.
  3. Only Larry should be paid for three hours of overtime.
  4. Neither Larry nor Mark should be paid overtime.

Answer

Question 6:

Using the same facts and answer options as question 5 (Larry and Mark go to Portland for training), would overtime pay be required if both Larry and Mark took the train to Portland?

  1. Larry and Mark should each be paid three hours of overtime.
  2. Only Mark should be paid for three hours of overtime.
  3. Only Larry should be paid for three hours of overtime.
  4. Neither Larry nor Mark should be paid overtime.

Answer

Question 7:

True or false: Beginning in 2018, employees who have worked for 90 days or more will be entitled to take paid sick leave, which will accumulate at the rate of at least one hour for every 40-hour work week they work.

 Answer

Question 8:

The commissioners want to hold an executive session “to discuss personnel.” Is that permissible?

  1. No, discussing personnel is not a permitted reason for holding an executive session.
  2. Yes, so long as no final decision is made during the executive session.
  3. Yes, but only if it is also announced that the commissioners will, for example, consider a complaint against an employee or develop a strategy to use during collective bargaining.
  4. Yes, provided the discussion occurs after the discussion of another subject for which an executive session is allowed, such as the purchase of property.

Answer

Question 9:

Phyllis works as a deputy clerk for a special purpose district. She also is a Sunday school teacher at her church. The church is requiring its teachers to attend an all-day training class on Wednesday, January 18 (a work day) so that they will be better able to teach their classes during the year. Phyllis has used all of her vacation days, and she has a report due at work on January 20. Can Phyllis ask to take January 18 off and expect that request to be honored?

  1. No. January 18 is not a holiday and she has no vacation time available.
  2. No, provided that the report is urgent and Phyllis is needed to complete it to give to the district’s board for a meeting that day.
  3. Yes, provided that the training class is being held as an organized activity of Phyllis’s church and others can complete the report.

Answer

Question 10:

Charlie is a police officer who works 40 hours per week. On weekends he will often volunteer several hours of work refereeing city league soccer matches. If Charlie works 40 hours one week and referees for two hours on Saturday, must he be paid for two hours of overtime?

  1. Yes, even though the refereeing is volunteered, he has worked 42 hours for a single employer during the week.
  2. No, the volunteer hours refereeing is not the same type of service that Charlie performs as a police officer.
  3. If Charlie reduces his regular police work hours by two hours, he would not be eligible for overtime pay.

Answer

Have a question or comment about this information? Let me know below or contact me directly at psullivan@mrsc.org.

About Paul Sullivan

Paul has worked with local governments since 1974 and has authored MRSC publications on local elections, ordinances, and general local government operation. He also provides training on the Open Public Meetings Act.

VIEW ALL POSTS BY Paul Sullivan

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